Tranquility Science Duty Logs

Moderator: Kermie Mistwallow

User avatar
Ferre Flamand
Science - Lieutenant Commander
Science - Lieutenant Commander
Posts: 424
Joined: 211111.0543
Duty Post: Vice Chief Science Officer
Ship/Station Posted: SS Tranquility
Grid: Second Life
Location: Belgium
Has thanked: 216 times
Been thanked: 62 times
Contact:

221030.2132

Tranquility Station/Ops + Tranquility Science Lab - Stardate 221031.0005
Reporting Officer: Lt Ferre Flamand
Other Officers on Duty: 4 NPC's

Duty Log - Daily Scientific and Observation Report

Surface environmental conditions

Nitrogen = 77.3 percent
Oxygen = 21.0 percent
Argon = 0.88 percent
Neon, Helium, Krypton = 0.0008 percent
Carbon dioxide = 0.31 percent
Water vapor = 0 - 4 percent

Fauna and Flora = All specific data found in local database.

Daystar condition = Thermal radiation within acceptable margins. One sunspot-grouping detected with rather minor flares. Practically no interference can be expected. Warming-up sequence at normal rate within range.

Betelgeuse (Alpha Orionis) its variable magnitude intervals within range. Brightened with 0,04 magnitude.

Today's project : Planet Engulfment Detections are Rare According to Observations and Stellar Modeling

Dynamical evolution within planetary systems can cause planets to be engulfed by their host stars. Following engulfment, the stellar photosphere abundance pattern will reflect accretion of rocky material from planets. Multi-star systems are excellent environments to search for such abundance trends because stellar companions form from the same natal gas cloud and are thus expected to share primordial chemical compositions to within 0.03−0.05 dex. Abundance measurements have occasionally yielded rocky enhancements, but few observations targeted known planetary systems. To address this gap, we carried out a Keck-HIRES survey of 36 multi-star systems where at least one star is a known planet host. We found that only HAT-P-4 exhibits an abundance pattern suggestive of engulfment, but is more likely primordial based on its large projected separation (30,000 ± 140 AU) that exceeds typical turbulence scales in molecular clouds. To understand the lack of engulfment detections among our systems, we quantified the strength and duration of refractory enrichments in stellar photospheres using MESA stellar models. We found that observable signatures from 10 M⊕ engulfment events last for ∼90 Myr in 1 M⊙ stars. Signatures are largest and longest lived for 1.1−1.2 M⊙ stars, but are no longer observable ∼2 Gyr post-engulfment. This indicates that engulfment will rarely be detected in systems that are several Gyr old.


-- end log --

:communicator: Lt Ferre Flamand
User avatar
Ferre Flamand
Science - Lieutenant Commander
Science - Lieutenant Commander
Posts: 424
Joined: 211111.0543
Duty Post: Vice Chief Science Officer
Ship/Station Posted: SS Tranquility
Grid: Second Life
Location: Belgium
Has thanked: 216 times
Been thanked: 62 times
Contact:

221101.0311

Tranquility Station/Ops + Tranquility Science Lab - Stardate 221101.0310
Reporting Officer: Lt Ferre Flamand
Other Officers on Duty: 4 NPC's

Duty Log - Daily Scientific and Observation Report

Surface environmental conditions

Nitrogen = 77.4 percent
Oxygen = 21.2 percent
Argon = 0.88 percent
Neon, Helium, Krypton = 0.0008 percent
Carbon dioxide = 0.30 percent
Water vapor = 0 - 4 percent

Fauna and Flora = All specific data found in local database.

Daystar condition = Thermal radiation within acceptable margins. One sunspot-grouping detected with rather minor flares. Practically no interference can be expected. Warming-up sequence at normal rate within range.

Betelgeuse (Alpha Orionis) its variable magnitude intervals within range. Brightened with 0,02 magnitude.

Today's project : The effect of collisional erosion on the composition of Earth-analog planets in Grand Tack models: Implications for the formation of the Earth

Impact-induced erosion of the Earth's early crust during accretion of terrestrial bodies can significantly modify the primordial chemical composition of the Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE, that is, the composition of the crust added to the present-day mantle). In particular, it can be particularly efficient in altering the abundances of elements having a strong affinity for silicate melts (i.e. incompatible elements) as the early differentiated crust was preferentially enriched in those. Here, we further develop an erosion model (EROD) to quantify the effects of collisional erosion on the final composition of the BSE. Results are compared to the present-day BSE composition models and constraints on Earth's accretion processes are provided. The evolution of the BSE chemical composition resulting from crustal stripping is computed for entire accretion histories of about 50 Earth analogs in the context of the Grand Tack model. The chosen chemical elements span a wide range of incompatibility degrees. We find that a maximum loss of 40wt% can be expected for the most incompatible lithophile elements such as Rb, Th or U in the BSE when the crust is formed from low partial melting rates. Accordingly, depending on both the exact nature of the crust-forming processes during accretion and the accretion history itself, Refractory Lithophile Elements (RLE) may not be in chondritic relative proportions in the BSE. In that case, current BSE estimates may need to be corrected as a function of the geochemical incompatibility of these elements. Alternatively, if RLE are indeed in chondritic relative proportions in the BSE, accretion scenarios that are efficient in affecting the BSE chemical composition should be questioned.


-- end log --

:communicator: Lt Ferre Flamand
User avatar
Ferre Flamand
Science - Lieutenant Commander
Science - Lieutenant Commander
Posts: 424
Joined: 211111.0543
Duty Post: Vice Chief Science Officer
Ship/Station Posted: SS Tranquility
Grid: Second Life
Location: Belgium
Has thanked: 216 times
Been thanked: 62 times
Contact:

221101.2328

Tranquility Station/Ops + Tranquility Science Lab - Stardate 221102.0025
Reporting Officer: Lt Ferre Flamand
Other Officers on Duty: 4 NPC's + Ensign Will Trasher.

Duty Log - Daily Scientific and Observation Report

Surface environmental conditions

Nitrogen = 77.3 percent
Oxygen = 21.2 percent
Argon = 0.88 percent
Neon, Helium, Krypton = 0.0008 percent
Carbon dioxide = 0.28 percent
Water vapor = 0 - 4 percent

Fauna and Flora = All specific data found in local database.

Daystar condition = Thermal radiation within acceptable margins. One sunspot-grouping detected with rather minor flares. Practically no interference can be expected. Warming-up sequence at normal rate within range.

Betelgeuse (Alpha Orionis) its variable magnitude intervals within range. Brightened with 0,1 magnitude.

Today's project : Production of hot Jupiter candidates from high-eccentricity mechanisms for different initial planetary mass configurations

Hot Jupiters (HJs) are giant planets with orbital periods of the order of a few days with semimajor axis within ∼0.1 au. Several theories have been invoked in order to explain the origin of this type of planets, one of them being the high-eccentricity migration. This migration can occur through different high-eccentricity mechanisms. Our investigation focused on six different kinds of high-eccentricity mechanisms, namely, direct dispersion, coplanar, Kozai-Lidov, secular chaos, E1 and E2 mechanisms. We investigated the efficiency of these mechanisms for the production of HJ candidates in multi-planet systems initially tightly-packed in the semimajor axis, considering a large set of numerical simulations of the exact equations of motion in the context of the N-body problem. In particular, we analyzed the sensitivity of our results to the initial number of planets, the initial semimajor axis of the innermost planetary orbit, the initial configuration of planetary masses, and to the inclusion of general relativity effects. We found that the E1 mechanism is the most efficient in producing HJ candidates both in simulations with and without the contribution of general relativity, followed by the Kozai-Lidov and E2 mechanisms. Our results also revealed that, except for the initial equal planetary mass configuration, the E1 mechanism was notably efficient in the other initial planetary mass configurations considered in this work. Finally, we investigated the production of HJ candidates with prograde, retrograde, and alternating orbits. According to our statistical analysis, the Kozai-Lidov mechanism has the highest probability of significantly exciting the orbital inclinations of the HJ candidates.

-- end log --

:communicator: Lt Ferre Flamand
User avatar
Ferre Flamand
Science - Lieutenant Commander
Science - Lieutenant Commander
Posts: 424
Joined: 211111.0543
Duty Post: Vice Chief Science Officer
Ship/Station Posted: SS Tranquility
Grid: Second Life
Location: Belgium
Has thanked: 216 times
Been thanked: 62 times
Contact:

221105.0348

Tranquility Station/Ops + Tranquility Science Lab - Stardate 221105.0300
Reporting Officer: Lt Ferre Flamand
Other Officers on Duty: 4 NPC's + Captain Rowena Luna Vandread-Rose as a visitor.
Duty Log - Daily Scientific and Observation Report

Captain Rowena Luna Vandread-Rose came along to investigate my report on a "foreign presumably female body" floating in space in the vicinity of Tranquility Station.

Surface environmental conditions

Nitrogen = 77.2 percent
Oxygen = 21.1 percent
Argon = 0.88 percent
Neon, Helium, Krypton = 0.0008 percent
Carbon dioxide = 0.29 percent
Water vapor = 0 - 4 percent

Fauna and Flora = All specific data found in local database.

Daystar condition = Thermal radiation within acceptable margins. One sunspot-grouping detected with rather minor flares. Practically no interference can be expected. Warming-up sequence at normal rate within range.

Betelgeuse (Alpha Orionis) its variable magnitude intervals within range. Brightened with 0,012 magnitude.

Today's project : Toward a multidimensional analysis of transmission spectroscopy

New-generation spectrographs dedicated to the study of exoplanetary atmospheres require a high accuracy in the atmospheric models to better interpret the input spectra. Thanks to space missions such as James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), ARIEL, and Twinkle, the observed spectra will indeed cover a large wavelength range from visible to mid-infrared with an higher precision compared to the old-generation instrumentation, revealing complex features coming from different regions of the atmosphere. For hot and ultra hot Jupiters (HJs and UHJs), the main source of complexity in the spectra comes from thermal and chemical differences between the day and the night sides. In this context, 1D plane parallel retrieval models of atmospheres may not be suitable to extract the complexity of such spectra. In addition, Bayesian frameworks are computationally intensive and prevent us from using complete 3D self-consistent models to retrieve exoplanetary atmospheres, and they require us to use simplified models to converge at a set of atmospheric parameters. We thus propose the TauREx 2D retrieval code, which uses 2D atmospheric models as a good compromise between computational cost and model accuracy to better infer exoplanetary atmospheric characteristics for the hottest planets. TauREx 2D uses a 2D parametrization across the limb which computes the transmission spectrum from an exoplanetary atmosphere assuming azimuthal symmetry. It also includes a thermal dissociation model of various species. We demonstrate that, given an input observation, TauREx 2D mitigates the biases between the retrieved atmospheric parameters and the real atmospheric parameters. We also show that having prior knowledge of the link between local temperature and composition is instrumental in inferring the temperature structure of the atmosphere. Finally, we apply such a model on a synthetic spectrum computed from a global climate model (GCM) simulation of WASP-121b and show how parameter biases can be removed when using 2D forward models across the limb.

-- end log --

:communicator: Lt Ferre Flamand
Vice Chief Science Officer
SS Tranquility
User avatar
Ferre Flamand
Science - Lieutenant Commander
Science - Lieutenant Commander
Posts: 424
Joined: 211111.0543
Duty Post: Vice Chief Science Officer
Ship/Station Posted: SS Tranquility
Grid: Second Life
Location: Belgium
Has thanked: 216 times
Been thanked: 62 times
Contact:

221106.0339

Tranquility Station/Ops + Tranquility Science Lab - Stardate 221106.0300
Reporting Officer: Lt Ferre Flamand
Other Officers on Duty: 4 NPC's
Duty Log - Daily Scientific and Observation Report

Surface environmental conditions

Nitrogen = 77.1 percent
Oxygen = 21.0 percent
Argon = 0.88 percent
Neon, Helium, Krypton = 0.0008 percent
Carbon dioxide = 0.27 percent
Water vapor = 0 - 4 percent

Fauna and Flora = All specific data found in local database.

Daystar condition = Thermal radiation within acceptable margins. One sunspot-grouping detected with rather minor flares. Practically no interference can be expected. Warming-up sequence at normal rate within range.

Betelgeuse (Alpha Orionis) its variable magnitude intervals within range. Brightened with 0,01 magnitude.

Today's project : The HD 93963 A transiting system: A 1.04 d super-Earth and a 3.65 d sub-Neptune discovered by TESS and CHEOPS

We present the discovery of two small planets transiting HD 93963A (TOI-1797), a GOV star (M* = 1.109 ± 0.043M⊙, R* = 1.043 ± 0.009 R⊙) in a visual binary system. We combined TESS and CHEOPS space-borne photometry with MuSCAT 2 ground-based photometry, ‘Alopeke and PHARO high-resolution imaging, TRES and FIES reconnaissance spectroscopy, and SOPHIE radial velocity measurements. We validated and spectroscopically confirmed the outer transiting planet HD 93963 A c, a sub-Neptune with an orbital period of Pc ≈ 3.65 d that was reported to be a TESS object of interest (TOI) shortly after the release of Sector 22 data. HD 93963 A c has amass of Mc = 19.2 ± 4.1 M⊕ and a radius of Rc = 3.228 ± 0.059 R⊕, implying a mean density of ρc = 3.1 ± 0.7 g cm-3. The inner object, HD 93963 A b, is a validated 1.04 d ultra-short period (USP) transiting super-Earth that we discovered in the TESS light curve and that was not listed as a TOI, owing to the low significance of its signal (TESS signal-to-noise ratio ≈6.7, TESS + CHEOPS combined transit depth Db = 141.5−8.3+8.5 ppm). We intensively monitored the star with CHEOPS by performing nine transit observations to confirm the presence of the inner planet and validate the system. HD 93963 A b is the first small (Rb = 1.35 ± 0.042 R⊕) USP planet discovered and validated by TESS and CHEOPS. Unlike planet c, HD 93963 Ab is not significantly detected in our radial velocities (Mb = 7.8 ± 3.2 M⊕). The two planets are on either side of the radius valley, implying that they could have undergone completely different evolution processes. We also discovered a linear trend in our Doppler measurements, suggesting the possible presence of a long-period outer planet. With a V-band magnitude of 9.2, HD 93963 A is among the brightest stars known to host a USP planet, making it one of the most favourable targets for precise mass measurement via Doppler spectroscopy and an important laboratory to test formation, evolution, and migration models of planetary systems hosting ultra-short period planets.

-- end log --

:communicator: Lt Ferre Flamand
Vice Chief Science Officer
SS Tranquility
User avatar
Ferre Flamand
Science - Lieutenant Commander
Science - Lieutenant Commander
Posts: 424
Joined: 211111.0543
Duty Post: Vice Chief Science Officer
Ship/Station Posted: SS Tranquility
Grid: Second Life
Location: Belgium
Has thanked: 216 times
Been thanked: 62 times
Contact:

221107.0450

Tranquility Station/Ops + Tranquility Science Lab - Stardate 221107.0300
Reporting Officer: Lt Ferre Flamand
Other Officers on Duty: 4 NPC's
Duty Log - Daily Scientific and Observation Report

Surface environmental conditions

Nitrogen = 77.4 percent
Oxygen = 21.2 percent
Argon = 0.87 percent
Neon, Helium, Krypton = 0.0008 percent
Carbon dioxide = 0.24 percent
Water vapor = 0 - 4 percent

Fauna and Flora = All specific data found in local database.

Daystar condition = Thermal radiation within acceptable margins. One sunspot-grouping detected with rather minor flares. Practically no interference can be expected. Warming-up sequence at normal rate within range.

Betelgeuse (Alpha Orionis) its variable magnitude intervals within range. Dimmed with 0,04 magnitude.

Today's project : Unstructured Grid Dynamical Modeling of Planetary Atmospheres using planetMPAS: The Influence of the Rigid Lid, Computational Efficiency, and Examples of Martian and Jovian Application

We present a new planetary global circulation model, planetMPAS, based on the state-of-the-art NCAR MPAS General Circulation Model. Taking advantage of the cross compatibility between WRF and MPAS, planetMPAS includes most of the planetWRF physics parameterization schemes for terrestrial planets such as Mars and Titan. PlanetMPAS also includes a set of physics that represents radiative transfer, dry convection, moist convection and its associated microphysics for the Jovian atmosphere. We demonstrate that, despite the rigid-lid approximation, planetMPAS is suitable to simulate the climate systems in Martian and Jovian atmospheres with potential application to slow-rotating planets such as Titan. Simulations using planetMPAS show that the new model can reproduce many aspects of the observed features on Mars and Jupiter, such as the seasonal CO2 cycle, polar argon enrichment, zonal mean temperature, and qualitative dust opacity on Mars, as well as the equatorial superrotation and banded zonal wind patterns on Jupiter.

-- end log --

:communicator: Lt Ferre Flamand
Vice Chief Science Officer
SS Tranquility
User avatar
Ferre Flamand
Science - Lieutenant Commander
Science - Lieutenant Commander
Posts: 424
Joined: 211111.0543
Duty Post: Vice Chief Science Officer
Ship/Station Posted: SS Tranquility
Grid: Second Life
Location: Belgium
Has thanked: 216 times
Been thanked: 62 times
Contact:

221108.0035

Tranquility Station/Ops + Tranquility Science Lab - Stardate 221108.0005
Reporting Officer: Lt Ferre Flamand
Other Officers on Duty: 4 NPC's

Duty Log - Daily Scientific and Observation Report

Surface environmental conditions

Nitrogen = 77.2 percent
Oxygen = 21.2 percent
Argon = 0.88 percent
Neon, Helium, Krypton = 0.0008 percent
Carbon dioxide = 0.25 percent
Water vapor = 0 - 4 percent

Fauna and Flora = All specific data found in local database.

Daystar condition = Thermal radiation within acceptable margins. Two sunspot-groupings detected with rather minor flares. Practically no interference can be expected. Warming-up sequence at normal rate within range.

Betelgeuse (Alpha Orionis) its variable magnitude intervals within range. Brightened with 0,3 magnitude.

Today's project : Gaia–TESS synergy: improving the identification of transit candidates

Context. The TESS team periodically issues a new list of transiting exoplanet candidates based on the analysis of the accumulating light curves obtained by the satellite. The list includes the estimated epochs, periods, and durations of the potential transits. As the point spread function (PSF) of TESS is relatively wide, follow-up photometric observations at higher spatial resolution are required in order to exclude apparent transits that are actually blended background eclipsing binaries (BEBs).

Aims. The Gaia space mission, with its growing database of epoch photometry and high angular resolution, enables the production of distinct light curves for all sources included in the TESS PSF, up to the limiting magnitude of Gaia. This paper reports the results of an ongoing Gaia-TESS collaboration that uses the Gaia photometry to facilitate the identification of BEB candidates and even to confirm on-target candidates in some cases.

Methods. We inspected the Gaia photometry of the individual sources included in the TESS PSF, searching for periodic dimming events compatible with their ephemerides and uncertainties, as published by TESS. The performance of the search depends mainly on the number of Gaia measurements during transit and their precision.

Results. Since February 2421, the collaboration has been able to confirm 126 on-target candidates and exclude 124 as BEBs. Since June 2421, when our search methodology matured, we have been able to identify on the order of 5% as on-target candidates and another 5% as BEBs.

Conclusions. This synergistic approach is combining the complementary capabilities of two of the astronomical space missions of NASA and ESA. It serves to optimize the process of detecting new planets by making better use of the resources of the astronomical community.

-- end log --

:communicator: Lt Ferre Flamand
User avatar
Ferre Flamand
Science - Lieutenant Commander
Science - Lieutenant Commander
Posts: 424
Joined: 211111.0543
Duty Post: Vice Chief Science Officer
Ship/Station Posted: SS Tranquility
Grid: Second Life
Location: Belgium
Has thanked: 216 times
Been thanked: 62 times
Contact:

221109.0227

Tranquility Station/Ops + Tranquility Science Lab - Stardate 221109.0200
Reporting Officer: Lt Ferre Flamand
Other Officers on Duty: 4 NPC's

Duty Log - Daily Scientific and Observation Report

Surface environmental conditions

Nitrogen = 77.4 percent
Oxygen = 21.2 percent
Argon = 0.87 percent
Neon, Helium, Krypton = 0.0008 percent
Carbon dioxide = 0.28 percent
Water vapor = 0 - 4 percent

Fauna and Flora = All specific data found in local database.

Daystar condition = Thermal radiation within acceptable margins. Two sunspot-groupings detected with rather minor flares. Practically no interference can be expected. Warming-up sequence at normal rate within range.

Betelgeuse (Alpha Orionis) its variable magnitude intervals within range. Brightened with 0,21 magnitude.

Today's project : Extending optical flare models to the UV: results from comparing of TESS and GALEX flare observations for M Dwarfs

The ultraviolet (UV) emission of stellar flares may have a pivotal role in the habitability of rocky exoplanets around low-mass stars. Previous studies have used white-light observations to calibrate empirical models which describe the optical and UV flare emission. However, the accuracy of the UV predictions of models have previously not been tested. We combined TESS optical and GALEX UV observations to test the UV predictions of empirical flare models calibrated using optical flare rates of M stars. We find that the canonical 9000 K blackbody model used by flare studies underestimates the GALEX NUV energies of field age M stars by up to a factor of 6.5 ± 0.7 and the GALEX FUV energies of fully convective field age M stars by 30.6 ± 10.0. We calculated energy correction factors that can be used to bring the UV predictions of flare models closer in line with observations. We calculated pseudo-continuum flare temperatures that describe both the white-light and GALEX NUV emission. We measured a temperature of 10,700 K for flares from fully convective M stars after accounting for the contribution from UV line emission. We also applied our correction factors to the results of previous studies of the role of flares in abiogenesis. Our results show that M stars do not need to be as active as previously thought in order to provide the NUV flux required for prebiotic chemistry, however we note that flares will also provide more FUV flux than previously modelled.

-- end log --

:communicator: Lt Ferre Flamand
User avatar
Ferre Flamand
Science - Lieutenant Commander
Science - Lieutenant Commander
Posts: 424
Joined: 211111.0543
Duty Post: Vice Chief Science Officer
Ship/Station Posted: SS Tranquility
Grid: Second Life
Location: Belgium
Has thanked: 216 times
Been thanked: 62 times
Contact:

221110.0804

Tranquility Station/Ops + Tranquility Science Lab - Stardate 221110.0800
Reporting Officer: Lt Ferre Flamand
Other Officers on Duty: 4 NPC's

Duty Log - Daily Scientific and Observation Report

Surface environmental conditions

Nitrogen = 77.3 percent
Oxygen = 21.3 percent
Argon = 0.89 percent
Neon, Helium, Krypton = 0.0008 percent
Carbon dioxide = 0.29 percent
Water vapor = 0 - 4 percent

Fauna and Flora = All specific data found in local database.

Daystar condition = Thermal radiation within acceptable margins. Two sunspot-groupings detected with rather minor flares. Practically no interference can be expected. Warming-up sequence at normal rate within range.

Betelgeuse (Alpha Orionis) its variable magnitude intervals within range. Brightened with 0,12 magnitude.

Today's project : Chasing extreme planetary architectures: I- HD196885Ab, a super-Jupiter dancing with two stars?

Planet(s) in binaries are unique architectures for testing predictions of planetary formation and evolution theories in very hostile environments. We used the IRDIS dual-band imager of SPHERE at VLT, and the speckle interferometric camera HRCAM of SOAR, to acquire high-angular resolution images of HD 196885 AB between 2415 and 2420. Radial velocity observations have been extended over almost 40 yr extending the radial velocity measurements HD 196885 A and resolving both the binary companion and the inner giant planet HD 196885 Ab. Finally, we took advantage of the exquisite astrometric precision of the dual-field mode of VLTI/GRAVITY (down to 30 {\mu}as) to monitor the relative position of HD 196885 A and B to search for the 3.6 yr astrometric wobble of the circumprimary planet Ab imprinted on the binary separation. Our observations enable to accurately constrain the orbital properties of the binary HD 196885 AB, seen on an inclined and retrograde orbit (iAB = 120.43 deg) with a semi-major axis of 19.78 au, and an eccentricity of 0.417. The GRAVITY measurements confirm for the first time the nature of the inner planet HD 196885 Ab by rejecting all families of pole-on solutions in the stellar or brown dwarf masses. The most favored island of solutions is associated with a Jupiter-like planet (MAb = 3.39 MJup), with moderate eccentricity (eAaAb = 0.44), and inclination close to 143.04 deg. This results points toward a significant mutual inclination (Phi = 24.36 deg) between the orbital planes (relative to the star) of the binary companion B and the planet Ab. Our dynamical simulations indicate that the system is dynamically stable over time. Eccentricity and mutual inclination variations could be expected for moderate von Zipele Kozai Lidov cycles that may affect the inner planet.

-- end log --

:communicator: Lt Ferre Flamand
User avatar
Ferre Flamand
Science - Lieutenant Commander
Science - Lieutenant Commander
Posts: 424
Joined: 211111.0543
Duty Post: Vice Chief Science Officer
Ship/Station Posted: SS Tranquility
Grid: Second Life
Location: Belgium
Has thanked: 216 times
Been thanked: 62 times
Contact:

221111.0316

Tranquility Station/Ops + Tranquility Science Lab - Stardate 221111.0315
Reporting Officer: Lt Ferre Flamand
Other Officers on Duty: 4 NPC's

Duty Log - Daily Scientific and Observation Report

Surface environmental conditions

Nitrogen = 77.1 percent
Oxygen = 21.3 percent
Argon = 0.89 percent
Neon, Helium, Krypton = 0.0008 percent
Carbon dioxide = 0.28 percent
Water vapor = 0 - 4 percent

Fauna and Flora = All specific data found in local database.

Daystar condition = Thermal radiation within acceptable margins. Two sunspot-groupings detected with rather minor flares. Practically no interference can be expected. Warming-up sequence at normal rate within range.

Betelgeuse (Alpha Orionis) its variable magnitude intervals within range. Brightened with 0,11 magnitude.

Today's project : Chaos in multiplanetary extrasolar systems

Here we present an initial look at the dynamics and stability of 178 multiplanetary systems which are already confirmed and listed in the NASA Exoplanet Archive. To distinguish between the chaotic and regular nature of a system, the value of the MEGNO indicator for each system was determined. Almost three-quarters of them could be labelled as long-term stable. Only 45 studied systems show chaotic behaviour. We consequently investigated the effects of the number of planets and their parameters on the system stability. A comparison of results obtained using the MEGNO indicator and machine-learning algorithm SPOCK suggests that the SPOCK could be used as an effective tool for reviewing the stability of multiplanetary systems. A similar study was already published by Laskar and Petit in 2417. We compared their analysis based on the AMD criterion with our results. The possible discrepancies are discussed.

-- end log --

:communicator: Lt Ferre Flamand
User avatar
Ferre Flamand
Science - Lieutenant Commander
Science - Lieutenant Commander
Posts: 424
Joined: 211111.0543
Duty Post: Vice Chief Science Officer
Ship/Station Posted: SS Tranquility
Grid: Second Life
Location: Belgium
Has thanked: 216 times
Been thanked: 62 times
Contact:

221113.0306

Tranquility Station/Ops + Tranquility Science Lab - Stardate 221113.0300
Reporting Officer: Lt Ferre Flamand
Other Officers on Duty: 4 NPC's

Duty Log - Daily Scientific and Observation Report

Surface environmental conditions

Nitrogen = 77.2 percent
Oxygen = 21.3 percent
Argon = 0.89 percent
Neon, Helium, Krypton = 0.0008 percent
Carbon dioxide = 0.26 percent
Water vapor = 0 - 4 percent

Fauna and Flora = All specific data found in local database.

Daystar condition = Thermal radiation within acceptable margins. Three sunspot-groupings detected with rather minor flares. Slightly elevated interference can be expected. Warming-up sequence at normal rate within range.

Betelgeuse (Alpha Orionis) its variable magnitude intervals within range. Brightened with 0,04 magnitude.

Today's project : The Impact of Bayesian Hyperpriors on the Population-Level Eccentricity Distribution of Imaged Planets.

Orbital eccentricities directly trace the formation mechanisms and dynamical histories of substellar companions. Here, we study the effect of hyperpriors on the population-level eccentricity distributions inferred for the sample of directly imaged substellar companions (brown dwarfs and cold Jupiters) from hierarchical Bayesian modeling (HBM). We find that the choice of hyperprior can have a significant impact on the population-level eccentricity distribution inferred for imaged companions, an effect that becomes more important as the sample size and orbital coverage decrease to values that mirror the existing sample. We reanalyse the current observational sample of imaged giant planets in the 5-100 AU range from Bowler et al. (2420) and find that the underlying eccentricity distribution implied by the imaged planet sample is broadly consistent with the eccentricity distribution for close-in exoplanets detected using radial velocities. Furthermore, our analysis supports the conclusion from that study that long-period giant planets and brown dwarf eccentricity distributions differ by showing that it is robust to the choice of hyperprior. We release our HBM and forward modeling code in an open-source Python package, ePop!, and make it freely available to the community.

-- end log --

:communicator: Lt Ferre Flamand
User avatar
Ferre Flamand
Science - Lieutenant Commander
Science - Lieutenant Commander
Posts: 424
Joined: 211111.0543
Duty Post: Vice Chief Science Officer
Ship/Station Posted: SS Tranquility
Grid: Second Life
Location: Belgium
Has thanked: 216 times
Been thanked: 62 times
Contact:

221114.0011

Tranquility Station/Ops + Tranquility Science Lab - Stardate 221113.0010
Reporting Officer: Lt Ferre Flamand
Other Officers on Duty: 4 NPC's

Duty Log - Daily Scientific and Observation Report

Surface environmental conditions

Nitrogen = 77.7 percent
Oxygen = 21.0 percent
Argon = 0.89 percent
Neon, Helium, Krypton = 0.0008 percent
Carbon dioxide = 0.27 percent
Water vapor = 0 - 4 percent

Fauna and Flora = All specific data found in local database.

Daystar condition = Thermal radiation within acceptable margins. Three sunspot-groupings detected with rather minor flares. Slightly elevated interference can be expected. Warming-up sequence at normal rate within range.

Betelgeuse (Alpha Orionis) its variable magnitude intervals within range. Brightened with 0,02 magnitude.

Today's project : Giants through Time: Towards a Comprehensive Giant Planet Climatology.

Giant planets serve as natural laboratories to explore the processes shaping planetary climate. The next five years will likely transform our understanding of the extreme environments of the outer Solar System, with the culmination of the Juno and Cassini missions to Jupiter and Saturn and the arrival of a new capability for ice giant science (James Webb Space Telescope, JWST). GIANTCLIMES will capitalise on this chance of a generation by assembling the first comprehensive climatology of all four giants. My programme will provide insights that no single mission can: exploring atmospheric variability over long time spans using an unprecedented multi-decade archive of ground-based observations; new data from space telescopes and planetary missions; combined with world-leading spectral analysis techniques and interpretive models. GIANTCLIMES consists of three objectives:

1. CLIMATE CYCLES: Assemble the first quasi-continuous record of Jovian climate over three decades to identify natural patterns of atmospheric variability to predict spectacular storm eruptions and global-scale transformations of its banded structure.
2. STRATOSPHERES: Explore the changing stratospheres of seasonal Saturn and non-seasonal Jupiter over long timescales to develop a new paradigm for the radiative, chemical and transport processes shaping these poorly-understood atmospheric regimes.
3. ICE GIANTS: Provide the benchmark for understanding the fundamental differences between Ice Giant and Gas Giant climate via existing Spitzer and Herschel observations of Uranus and Neptune, and produce the highly-anticipated first spatial maps of their stratospheres using JWST.

These projects will explore planetary climates in all their guises, using comparative remote sensing studies to understand the forces defining their natural variability. New insights and discoveries from GIANTCLIMES will reinforce my leading role in the next generation of ambitious missions to explore the giant planets.

-- end log --

:communicator: Lt Ferre Flamand
User avatar
Ferre Flamand
Science - Lieutenant Commander
Science - Lieutenant Commander
Posts: 424
Joined: 211111.0543
Duty Post: Vice Chief Science Officer
Ship/Station Posted: SS Tranquility
Grid: Second Life
Location: Belgium
Has thanked: 216 times
Been thanked: 62 times
Contact:

221115.0249

Tranquility Station/Ops + Tranquility Science Lab - Stardate 221115.0245
Reporting Officer: Lt Ferre Flamand
Other Officers on Duty: 4 NPC's

Duty Log - Daily Scientific and Observation Report

Surface environmental conditions

Nitrogen = 77.5 percent
Oxygen = 21.1 percent
Argon = 0.88 percent
Neon, Helium, Krypton = 0.0008 percent
Carbon dioxide = 0.26 percent
Water vapor = 0 - 4 percent

Fauna and Flora = All specific data found in local database.

Daystar condition = Thermal radiation within acceptable margins. Two sunspot-groupings detected with rather minor flares. Minimal elevated interference can be expected. Warming-up sequence at normal rate within range.

Betelgeuse (Alpha Orionis) its variable magnitude intervals within range. Dimmed with 0,07 magnitude.

Today's project : Analysis of Thermal Emissions of Exoplanets with Axially Symmetric Temperature Gradients.

Here a new method of modeling the thermal emissions of exoplanets is described, in which the temperature gradient of an exoplanet is approximated by splitting it into N zones. First, we seek to determine how much this method differs from a simple dayside–nightside model used by previous researchers and found that the difference between the N-zone and the dayside–nightside models is greatest during the primary transit of the exoplanet, and for large temperature gradients. Next, we determine under what conditions EXONEST, a Bayesian inference software package, is able to correctly determine the model used to generate synthetic light-curve data. EXONEST is best able to determine the model used to generate synthetic data when the mass of the exoplanet is known, the added noise to the data is low, and the thermal emissions are large compared to the ellipsoidal variations. Finally, EXONEST was used to analyze photometric data for exoplanets Kepler-41b and Kepler-412b, and the dayside brightness temperatures were estimated to be 2574 ± 59 and 2496 ± 64 K, and those of the nightside were estimated to be 860 ± 316 and 874 ± 333 K for Kepler-41b and Kepler-412b, respectively. Finally, we found that the hottest zone for both planets was the zone nearest the terminator on the dayside of the exoplanet. This surprising result suggests that the model is better applied to exoplanets with little to no heat recirculation.

-- end log --

:communicator: Lt Ferre Flamand
User avatar
Ferre Flamand
Science - Lieutenant Commander
Science - Lieutenant Commander
Posts: 424
Joined: 211111.0543
Duty Post: Vice Chief Science Officer
Ship/Station Posted: SS Tranquility
Grid: Second Life
Location: Belgium
Has thanked: 216 times
Been thanked: 62 times
Contact:

221120.0446

Tranquility Station/Ops + Tranquility Science Lab - Stardate 221120.0445
Reporting Officer: Lt Ferre Flamand
Other Officers on Duty: 4 NPC's

Duty Log - Daily Scientific and Observation Report

Surface environmental conditions

Nitrogen = 77.7 percent
Oxygen = 21.6 percent
Argon = 0.88 percent
Neon, Helium, Krypton = 0.0008 percent
Carbon dioxide = 0.22 percent
Water vapor = 0 - 4 percent

Fauna and Flora = All specific data found in local database.

Daystar condition = Thermal radiation within acceptable margins. Two sunspot-groupings detected with rather minor flares. Minimal elevated interference can be expected. Warming-up sequence at normal rate within range.

Betelgeuse (Alpha Orionis) its variable magnitude intervals within range. Dimmed with 0,1 magnitude.

Today's project : A search for transit timing variations within the exomoon corridor using Kepler data.

An exomoon will produce transit timing variations (TTVs) upon the parent planet and their undersampled nature causes half of such TTVs to manifest within a frequency range of 2 to 4 cycles, irrespective of exomoon demographics. Here, we search through published Kepler TTV data for such signals, applying a battery of significance and robustness checks, plus independent light curve analyses for candidate signals. Using the original transit times, we identify 11 (ostensibly) single-planets with a robust, significant and fast (PTTV<4 cycles) TTV signal. However, of these, only 5 are recovered in an independent analysis of the original photometry, underscoring the importance of such checks. The surviving signals are subjected to an additional trifecta of statistical tests to ensure signal significance, predictive capability and consistency with an exomoon. KOI-3678.01, previously validated as Kepler-1513b, is the only case that passes every test, exhibiting a highly significant (>20 sigma) TTV signal with a periodicity, amplitude and shape consistent with that caused by an exomoon. Our analysis finds that this planet is 8.2+0.7−0.5 R⊕ orbiting at 0.53+0.04−0.03 AU around a late G-type dwarf. After forecasting the planetary mass, we expect it to be capable of maintaining at least a 0.3 M⊕ exomoon for 5 Gyr, and the TTV signal corresponds to a moon mass as low as 0.75 Lunar masses. We thus encourage follow-up observations and dynamical analysis of this unique signal, but caution skepticism until such data can be obtained.

-- end log --

:communicator: Lt Ferre Flamand
User avatar
Ferre Flamand
Science - Lieutenant Commander
Science - Lieutenant Commander
Posts: 424
Joined: 211111.0543
Duty Post: Vice Chief Science Officer
Ship/Station Posted: SS Tranquility
Grid: Second Life
Location: Belgium
Has thanked: 216 times
Been thanked: 62 times
Contact:

221121.0307

Tranquility Station/Ops + Tranquility Science Lab - Stardate 221121.0305
Reporting Officer: Lt Ferre Flamand
Other Officers on Duty: 4 NPC's

Duty Log - Daily Scientific and Observation Report

Surface environmental conditions

Nitrogen = 77.8 percent
Oxygen = 21.4 percent
Argon = 0.88 percent
Neon, Helium, Krypton = 0.0008 percent
Carbon dioxide = 0.23 percent
Water vapor = 0 - 4 percent

Fauna and Flora = All specific data found in local database.

Daystar condition = Thermal radiation within acceptable margins. Two sunspot-groupings detected with rather minor flares and one forming. Minimal elevated interference can be expected. Warming-up sequence at normal rate within range.

Betelgeuse (Alpha Orionis) its variable magnitude intervals within range. Dimmed with 0,07 magnitude.

Today's project : Ultimate limits of exoplanet spectroscopy: a quantum approach.

One of the big challenges in exoplanet science is to determine the atmospheric makeup of extrasolar planets, and to find biosignatures that hint at the existence of biochemical processes on another world. The biomarkers we are trying to detect are gases in the exoplanet atmosphere like oxygen or methane, which have deep absorption features in the visible and near-infrared spectrum. Here we establish the ultimate quantum limit for determining the presence or absence of a spectral absorption line, for a dim source in the presence of a much brighter stellar source. We characterise the associated error exponent in both the frameworks of symmetric and asymmetric hypothesis testing. We found that a structured measurement based on spatial demultiplexing allows us to decouple the light coming from the planet and achieve the ultimate quantum limits. If the planet has intensity ϵ≪1 relative to the star, we show that this approach significantly outperforms direct spectroscopy yielding an improvement of the error exponent by a factor 1/ϵ. We find the optimal measurement, which is a combination of interferometric techniques and spectrum analysis.

-- end log --

:communicator: Lt Ferre Flamand
Post Reply

Return to “SS Tranquility Crew Logs”