Botany and the BBC Micro:bit

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Summoner Castaignede
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200421.1219

Recently, I got hold of a BBC Micro:bit - it's a very basic little circuit board for learning electronics and coding. The device itself has several built in functions -- accelerometer, magnetometer, thermometer, radio and bluetooth, and an LED display that also doubles as a light level-reader.

The coding method is very simple too, using blocks of code that can be assembled to create little programs. (These blocks are turned into javascript when you put them together on the Microsoft MakeCode website.)

As a gardener, I've had a particular interest in using the micro:bit to create a tool that will help me -- and ultimately, my dream is to build a weather station using it, but that will need to wait until I can get the equipment to do so! xD

In the meantime, I wrote a little script for the micro:bit so that it can read room temperature, light level, and soil moisture level. =)



(Don't mind my slightly stuttery babbling xD I was doing this completely off the cuff!)

~Summo
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Fiona DeCuir
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200421.1324

Just to clarify how this works --

The onboard temperature sensor measures the surrounding temperature.

The light level is from the light sensor.

The soil moisture reading comes from having two metal rods inserted into my plant pot. The crocodile clips are attached to the metal rods at one end, and to the input pins on the micro:bit. The micro:bit itself can generate a current, and although soil isn't normally conductive, the mixture of water and nutrients in the soil itself can lower the electrical resistance, thus allowing volts to pass through it. This voltage is what the micro:bit is reading during the test.
“You do not lead by hitting people over the head—that’s assault, not leadership.” - Dwight D. Eisenhower.

Fiona DeCuir
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